We Need a Just Transition—Because We Should Abandon Coal, Not Coal Workers

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine The coal industry is dying. But we can’t allow the communities that have been dependent on coal to die along with it. Even if clean energy champions, environmentalists, and climate activists weren’t working together to end the burning of coal, the dirtiest of all […]

Some of the Country’s Biggest Supporters of Climate Action? Latinos.

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine More than 58 million people currently living in the U.S. — 17 percent of the population — are of Latin-American descent. By 2065 that percentage is expected to rise to nearly a quarter. Hardly a monolith, this diverse group includes people with roots in […]

Has Climate Consciousness Reached a Tipping Point?

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine Nearly 20 years have passed since the journalist Malcolm Gladwell popularized the term tipping point, in his best-selling book of the same name. The phrase denotes the moment that a certain idea, behavior, or practice catches on exponentially and gains widespread currency throughout a […]

An Artist Who Finds Uncommon Meaning in Common Trees

This post was originally published on this site By Patrick Rogers “I’m really into trees,” said the sculptor Hugh Hayden. “I’m drawn to plants.” Nature and plants have always been a source of fascination for the artist, who grew up near a protected greenway on the outskirts of Dallas. “My family was always outdoors, not […]

That Summer When Climate Change Baked Alaska

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine Chris McKee lived down the street from me when we were kids growing up in suburban Dallas. Even though we haven’t seen each other face-to-face in many years, Chris and I have managed to stay in touch through the mixed blessing of social media. […]

This Mayor Puts the ‘Conserve’ Back in Conservative

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine I met Jim Brainard recently on a sunny summer afternoon in Bryant Park, a grassy oasis roughly the size of one square block nestled among the skyscrapers of midtown Manhattan. The stately New York Public Library — one of the city’s most famous cultural […]

Watch These Young Spoken-Word Poets Take On Climate Change

This post was originally published on this site By Courtney Lindwall Across the world, tens of thousands of young people are taking to the streets to protest climate inaction. And at the historic Apollo Theater in Harlem last month, more than a dozen of them took to the stage. On the final night of Climate […]

Why Everybody Is So Excited About 23 Salmon

This post was originally published on this site By Alisa Opar For Chinook salmon, the urge to return home and spawn isn’t just strong — it’s imperative. And for the first time in more than 65 years, at least 23 fish that migrated as juveniles from California’s San Joaquin River and into the Pacific Ocean […]

In the Fight Against Climate Change, Humans and Wildlife Are Allies

This post was originally published on this site By Jason Bittel Planet Earth is in crisis, and we’re all in it together. One million species could soon face extinction. Climate change is accelerating at a breakneck pace, already affecting about half of all threatened mammal species and a quarter of threatened birds. And according to […]

Is Climate Fiction a Subset of Science Fiction—or Something Else Entirely?

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine First off: Bangkok Wakes to Rain, the intricately wrought, elegantly crafted debut novel by the Thai-American author Pitchaya Sudbanthad, isn’t really about climate change. This tale set in the sprawling subtropical Thai capital is ultimately a kind of family saga — although its interconnected […]

When Your Planet Calls 911

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine Imagine that your doctor sat you down and told you, firmly and unequivocally, that your way of life was putting you at serious risk of heart failure. The only way to reduce this risk and avoid a possibly fatal health catastrophe, she said, was […]

Why Is HUD Ghosting America’s Hurricane-Ravaged Communities?

This post was originally published on this site By Jeff Turrentine The costliest hurricane season in our nation’s history took place two years ago, when 17 named storms—including three that went by the names of Harvey, Irma and Maria—all came ashore within a six-month period, killing more than 3,300 Americans and causing more than $300 […]