Diet Soda May Be Hurting Your Diet

By Eunice Zhang Artificial sweeteners are everywhere, but the jury is still out on whether these chemicals are harmless. Also called non-nutritive sweeteners, these can be synthetic—such as saccharin and aspartame—or naturally derived, such as steviol, which comes from the stevia plant. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved six types of … Read moreDiet Soda May Be Hurting Your Diet

Environmental Storytelling Can Help Spread Big Ideas for Saving the Planet

This post was originally published on this site By Denise Baden Tackling climate change will require huge changes in society. Decarbonizing energy, restoring habitat and making food supply sustainable are all critical, but methods for motivating these actions have typically taken the wrong approach—by highlighting the urgency of the issues and the disastrous consequences of … Read moreEnvironmental Storytelling Can Help Spread Big Ideas for Saving the Planet

Our Complicated Relationship With Plastic: 5 Essential Reads

This post was originally published on this site By Martin LaMonica From its arrival decades ago, plastic has transformed modern life. But in 2018, the alarm over the plastic pollution crisis sounded louder than ever. On Earth Day, the United Nations issued its first State of Plastics report, calling for more recycling and better ways … Read moreOur Complicated Relationship With Plastic: 5 Essential Reads

’Tis the Season to Redesign and Reduce Our Waste

This post was originally published on this site By Pamela Tudge The holiday season has a waste problem. On average, each Canadian produces 720 kilograms of municipal waste—more than the per capita output in the U.S. and double what is produced in Japan. And over the holidays, our waste volumes double. Think about it: We’re … Read more’Tis the Season to Redesign and Reduce Our Waste

What Lies Beneath: To Manage Toxic Contamination in Cities, Study Their Industrial Histories

This post was originally published on this site By James R. Elliott and Scott Frickel Philadelphia’s hip Northern Liberties community is an old working-class neighborhood that has become a model of trendy urban-chic redevelopment. Crowded with renovated row houses, bistros and boutique shops, the area is knit together by a pedestrian mall and a 2-acre … Read moreWhat Lies Beneath: To Manage Toxic Contamination in Cities, Study Their Industrial Histories

Global Warming ‘Hiatus’ Is the Climate Change Myth That Refuses to Die

This post was originally published on this site By Kevin Cowtan and Stephan Lewandowsky The record-breaking, El Niño-driven global temperatures of 2016 have given climate change deniers a new trope. Why, they ask, hasn’t it since got even hotter? In response to a recent U.S. government report on the impact of climate change, a spokesperson … Read moreGlobal Warming ‘Hiatus’ Is the Climate Change Myth That Refuses to Die

What Is ‘Green’ Dry Cleaning? A Toxics Expert Explains

This post was originally published on this site By Joy Onasch The winter holidays are a busy time for many businesses, including retail stores, grocers, liquor stores—and dry cleaners. People pull out special-occasion clothes made of silk, satin or other fabrics that don’t launder well in soap and water. Then there are all those specialty … Read moreWhat Is ‘Green’ Dry Cleaning? A Toxics Expert Explains

Don’t Stress About What Kind of Christmas Tree to Buy, but Reuse Artificial Trees and Compost Natural Ones

This post was originally published on this site By Bert Cregg Environmentally conscious consumers often ask me whether a real Christmas tree or an artificial one is the more sustainable choice. As a horticulture and forestry researcher, I know this question is also a concern for the Christmas tree industry, which is wary of losing … Read moreDon’t Stress About What Kind of Christmas Tree to Buy, but Reuse Artificial Trees and Compost Natural Ones

Climate Change Makes Soils Saltier, Forcing Farmers to Find New Livelihoods

By Joyce J. Chen and Valerie Mueller Salt is essential for cooking, but too much salt in soil can ruin crops and render fields useless. According to legend, Roman general Scipio Aemilianus Africanus sowed the soils of Carthage with salt after conquering the city during the Punic Wars. And after defeating the Italian town of … Read moreClimate Change Makes Soils Saltier, Forcing Farmers to Find New Livelihoods

Why People Become Vegans: The History, Sex and Science of a Meatless Existence

This post was originally published on this site By Joshua T. Beck At the age of 14, a young Donald Watson watched as a terrified pig was slaughtered on his family farm. In the British boy’s eyes, the screaming pig was being murdered. Watson stopped eating meat and eventually gave up dairy as well. Later, … Read moreWhy People Become Vegans: The History, Sex and Science of a Meatless Existence

Awareness of Food Waste Can Help Us Appreciate Holiday Meals

This post was originally published on this site By Bryce Hannibal Americans celebrate the winter holidays in many ways, which typically include an abundance of food, drinks, desserts—and waste. Food waste is receiving increasing attention from managers, activists, policymakers and scholars, who call it a global social problem. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture … Read moreAwareness of Food Waste Can Help Us Appreciate Holiday Meals

How We Can Turn Plastic Waste Into Green Energy

By Anh Phan In the adventure classic Back to the Future, Emmett “Doc” Brown uses energy generated from rubbish to power his DeLorean time machine. But while a time machine may still be some way off, the prospect of using rubbish for fuel isn’t too far from reality. Plastics, in particular, contain mainly carbon and … Read moreHow We Can Turn Plastic Waste Into Green Energy

Don’t Frack So Close to Me: Colorado to Vote on Drilling Distances From Homes and Schools

By Tara Opsal and Stephanie Malin Coloradans will vote on a ballot initiative in November that requires new oil and gas projects to be set back at least 2,500 feet from occupied buildings. If approved, the measure—known as both Initiative 97 and Proposition 112—would mark a major change from their state’s current limits: 500 feet … Read moreDon’t Frack So Close to Me: Colorado to Vote on Drilling Distances From Homes and Schools

Designing Greener Streets Starts With Finding Room for Bicycles and Trees

By Anne Lusk City streets and sidewalks in the U.S. have been engineered for decades to keep vehicle occupants and pedestrians safe. If streets include trees at all, they might be planted in small sidewalk pits, where, if constrained and with little water, they live only three to 10 years on average. Until recently, U.S. … Read moreDesigning Greener Streets Starts With Finding Room for Bicycles and Trees

Injecting Wastewater Underground Can Cause Earthquakes Up to 10 Kilometers Away

By Emily Brodsky Earthquakes in the central and eastern U.S. have increased dramatically in the last decade as a result of human activities. Enhanced oil recovery techniques, including dewatering and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, have made accessible large quantities of oil and gas previously trapped underground, but often result in a glut of contaminated wastewater … Read moreInjecting Wastewater Underground Can Cause Earthquakes Up to 10 Kilometers Away